Does an employee need help?

If an employee or co-worker’s safety is in immediate danger because of domestic violence, call 911 right now.

The police will take the situation seriously. Do not try to intervene directly on your own.

If that person is not in immediate danger, please call our 24-hour Crisis Line at (317) 745-1496. Your call will be answered by a trained professional who will ask questions and offer recommendations about the best way to get help.

Domestic abuse — whether it’s physical, emotional, sexual, psychological, or financial — is wrong, and it tends to get worse over time. Even worse, domestic violence can endanger others in your workplace, given that 74 percent of domestic violence victims report that their abuser has harassed them on the job. You have a legal and moral responsibility to ensure that your workplace is safe for your employees.

HOW CAN WE TELL IF AN EMPLOYEE IS BEING ABUSED?

The indicators of possible domestic violence vary widely, as does the nature of the abuse. If you notice one or more of these symptoms, you should be concerned:

  • numerous personal calls that leave the employee upset
  • strange bruises and frequent odd medical complaints
  • unexpected and unplanned time off or increased absences
  • sudden drops in productivity from normally productive employees
  • withdrawing from social situations with fellow employees
  • unusual gifts and flowers arriving at the workplace
  • attempts to cover bruises with long sleeves or sunglasses

HOW CAN WE HELP AN EMPLOYEE WHO IS BEING ABUSED?

First, recognize that most victims of domestic abuse are embarrassed and afraid, and may even be in denial that abuse is occurring. If you call our 24-hour Crisis Line at (317) 745-1496, our team will listen to the situation and offer advice.

You can best protect a victim by encouraging them to get help. If that person isn’t sure that he or she is being abused, have him or her answer these questions.

WHAT CAN WE DO TO PREVENT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

Just as employers educate workers about wellness-related issues such as exercise, nutrition, and substance abuse, you can help your team better understand the realities of domestic violence. Sheltering Wings can provide in-service presentations for your staff and managers about what they can do to prevent and respond to abuse. We also have resource cards and information that you can place in restrooms, break rooms, locker rooms, and other areas. When you take an active role to educate your employees, you send a clear message that there are resources available and you are willing to help.